• Figure 1_GInetwork_022217

Mapping the molecular chaperone network

4 October 2017|0 Comments

Rizzolo et al. from the Houry group provided a comprehensive view of molecular chaperone function in the cell through the use of a systematic global integrative network approach based on physical (protein-protein) and genetic (gene-gene or epistatic) interaction mapping. The analysis revealed the presence of a large chaperone functional supercomplex, which was named the NAJ […]

SickKids scientists obtain blueprint of molecular target for blood cancer and autoimmune therapies

4 October 2017|0 Comments

Researchers at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) have been exploring the molecular structure of immune cell components, and how gaining an understanding of their anatomical organization can help develop future targeted therapies for blood cancers and autoimmune diseases. Dr. Jean-Philippe Julien and co-authors, Dr. June Ereño-Orbea and Taylor Sicard provide the details of their […]

  • Ernst_Cell

How GPCRs use phosphorylation codes for arrestin recruitment

23 August 2017|0 Comments

DEER spectroscopy by Ned van Eps in the Ernst lab was used to validate the crystal structure of the phosphorylated G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin in complex with arrestin. EPR measurements confirmed the location of the C-terminal tail of rhodopsin on a arrestin binding surface in a non-crystallographic environment. GPCRs are among the most important cell […]

  • Steve_Bear Lab

Bear Lab shows that a new Cystic Fibrosis treatment improves function from a rare CFTR mutation in patient tissue

14 July 2017|0 Comments

The laboratory of Christine Bear, together with the group of Régis Pomès and collaborators at The Hospital for Sick Children and Proteostasis Therapeutics, used in silico, in vitro and ex vivo techniques to comprehensively understand the consequences of a rare Cystic Fibrosis (CF) disease-causing mutation in the CFTR gene: c.3700 A>G (ΔI1234_R1239), and subsequently develop […]

Howell lab deduces the mechanism of type IV pilus motors

5 May 2017|0 Comments

The type IV pilus is a long and sturdy grappling hook that bacteria use to attach to a surface and then pull themselves closer to the surface. They are important for virulence in many pathogens, including those that cause cholera, gonorrhoea, food-borne diseases, and multi-drug resistant hospital acquired infections. The molecular mechanism of the motors […]