• Ernst_Cell

How GPCRs use phosphorylation codes for arrestin recruitment

23 August 2017|0 Comments

DEER spectroscopy by Ned van Eps in the Ernst lab was used to validate the crystal structure of the phosphorylated G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin in complex with arrestin. EPR measurements confirmed the location of the C-terminal tail of rhodopsin on a arrestin binding surface in a non-crystallographic environment. GPCRs are among the most important cell […]

  • Steve_Bear Lab

Bear Lab shows that a new Cystic Fibrosis treatment improves function from a rare CFTR mutation in patient tissue

14 July 2017|0 Comments

The laboratory of Christine Bear, together with the group of Régis Pomès and collaborators at The Hospital for Sick Children and Proteostasis Therapeutics, used in silico, in vitro and ex vivo techniques to comprehensively understand the consequences of a rare Cystic Fibrosis (CF) disease-causing mutation in the CFTR gene: c.3700 A>G (ΔI1234_R1239), and subsequently develop […]

Howell lab deduces the mechanism of type IV pilus motors

5 May 2017|0 Comments

The type IV pilus is a long and sturdy grappling hook that bacteria use to attach to a surface and then pull themselves closer to the surface. They are important for virulence in many pathogens, including those that cause cholera, gonorrhoea, food-borne diseases, and multi-drug resistant hospital acquired infections. The molecular mechanism of the motors […]

New genetic disease discovered by Drs. Aleixo Muise and Walter Kahr

7 April 2017|0 Comments

Two of Biochemistry’s professors, Drs. Aleixo Muise and Walter Kahr have discovered a brand new genetic disease through their research at the Hospital for Sick Children.

Their research article is published on Nature Communications.

Their story was also highlighted on the Hospital for Sick Children, CBC The National and CBC News Network, and the Globe and Mail […]

Stagljar lab reveals new interactions among GPCRs

16 March 2017|0 Comments

Using the modified membrane yeast two‐hybrid (MYTH) technology, researchers from the Stagljar lab mapped membrane protein interactions for clinically important G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs).

Read the full story on Faculty of Medicine website.

Read their paper on Molecular Systems Biology.